How to Boost Your Immune System with Natural Antibiotics

Boost Your Immune System with Natural Antibiotics

Herbalist Susun Weed recognizes the possibility of biological warfare and she is ready to cope with it. With her help, you too can be prepared with herbal home remedies and natural antibiotics that you can use now to help avoid infection and to build a strong immune system. You can feel safer in these troubling times by learning about herbs that are effective against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and that can be used as natural antibiotics in conjunction with, or in place of (should there be a lack), modern antibiotics.

Anthrax. Smallpox. Plague. Diseases that can kill. Diseases that are now in the hands of terrorists. What if these diseases were released in your hometown, or the place where you work? What could you do if vaccines and treatments were in short supply or unavailable? Is there anything you can do now to prepare yourself and improve your chances of survival?

Anthrax bacteria (Bacillus anthracis) enter the body through breaks in the skin or through the nose and lungs. Early symptoms (which may take up to a week to occur) include reddish-black sores on the skin or in the lymph nodes around the lungs. Hemorrhagic fever and death follows. Treated early, anthrax succumbs to antibiotics and most people (75-80 percent) recover completely.

Even without treatment, according to some sources, more than half of those infected survive. (Genetically-engineered varieties may kill up to 90 percent of untreated victims.) The inhaled variety is more lethal because the early symptoms of infection are easily ignored, delaying treatment past the point of most effect, and because pneumonia infections frequently complicate the recovery. Anthrax is not contagious; that is, it is not passed from person to person.

The antibiotic Cipro is the treatment of choice for those definitely exposed to anthrax, but neither it nor any other antibiotic can prevent infection. It is dangerous to take modern antibiotics “just in case” for then they may not work when actually needed. Instead, try these home remedies and natural antibiotics.

Salt is lethal to bacteria. The simplest home remedy for those worried about exposure to anthrax is to rinse your nose with salt (any kind will do) mixed into water. Taste your mixture to be certain it is very salty. Getting this up your nose can be accomplished by putting your nose into the salt solution and snorting it in, or you may wish to buy a “neti pot,” a device from India used to rinse the nasal passages. Afterwards, blow your nose and spit out any residue that runs into the mouth.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is on the list of natural antibiotics that has been scientifically shown to kill all gram positive and gram negative bacteria. A small spray bottle of the tincture of the flowering tops can be used to spray the inside of the nose, killing any bacteria lurking there. Spraying tincture in your nose does sting a little and makes the eyes water, but don’t dilute it, the alcohol is antibacterial too.

Garlic has been used to prevent infection for thousands of years; and it still works! No need to upset your stomach (and loved ones) by eating it raw; cooked garlic retains its antibacterial powers, so long as you eat enough of it. During plague times, healers in some areas wore a “bird’s beak:” a stiff cone was made of paper or bark, stuffed with garlic and spices (cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg), and tied on over the nose to help prevent contagion. That’s a little cumbersome for modern times, but inhaling the aroma of a cup of spicy tea (there are many blends available, or make your own) could help forestall anthrax.

Medicinal mushrooms are not only immune system tonics, they possess antibacterial properties which make them ideal for preventing anthrax infection, according to expert Paul Stametes. A tincture or strong infusion of any shelf fungus with pores can be used, he says. If you prefer to buy your mushrooms, rather than hunt for them, look for reishii (Ganoderma lucidum) or shiitake (Lentinus edodes). Both are adaptogenic, revitalizing, regenerative, and able to directly suppress infection. Side effects, even from large doses, are rare.

Essential oils are antibacterial, and some sources suggest rubbing them inside the nose or spraying the air with these extremely concentrated oils to counter anthrax infections. I don’t. Essential oils are likely to cause a variety of side effects (such as damage to the mucus surfaces of the nose and lungs, and stress to the lymphatic system) that could, paradoxically, make infection more likely and more virulent.

Cayenne and golden seal are antibacterial, but too strong to be used as preventatives. Snuffing hot pepper up your nose would kill anthrax, but at the risk of irritating your nose and respiratory passages, damaging their protective mucus surfaces, and stressing your immune system. I rarely use golden seal, not only because it can cause severe side effects, but also because it is approaching extinction in the wild.

I prefer safer antibacterial herbs such as echinacea, usnea, or poke root, which not only kill infection, but also help us keep our immune systems strong. That, of course, is the desired result from immunization: to strengthen the immune system and alert it to the possibility of anthrax infection. Anthrax vaccines currently available for animals are not suitable for humans, and one prepared for people is in short supply (and only 93 percent effective). To achieve full immunity, one must have immunization shots every two weeks for six weeks, then again at 6, 12, and 18 months. Given that, herbs seem a superb alternative: They have an extensive history of countering resistant bacteria and strengthening the body’s natural defenses.

Echinacea root is the all-American immune system strengthener. It triggers production of white blood cells, interferon, leukocytes, T-cells, and B-lymphocytes, as well as directly inhibiting the growth of most bacteria and viruses. Peter Holmes, author of Energetics of Western Herbs, cites it as being effective against anthrax. Echinacea tincture is my first choice for countering infection. (Capsules and pills of echinacea, if used for lengthy periods, may be counterproductive.) A dose of the tincture is one drop for every pound of body weight. I take this several times a week as a preventative, several times daily when there is active infection. If I were exposed to anthrax, I would take a dose every hour for at least ten days.

Usnea, a common lichen, is especially rich in a powerful antibacterial bitter called usnic acid (also usinic acid). I use the tincture of Usnea barbata (a dose is 1-2 dropperfuls), but other lichens show similar immune-enhancing and tonifying properties. There are no side effects reported from use of even large amounts of usnea tincture.

Poke root tincture (Phytolacca americana) kicks the immune system into gear incredibly fast. I’ve seen chronic infection of many years’ standing resolve after only one dose, and acute infection subside in a matter of hours. Poke’s effect seems to be focused on the lymphatic and glandular tissues of the throat and chest, making it the perfect counter to inhaled anthrax, which attacks the lymph nodes around the lungs. Poke is a specific against pneumonia and a protector of the lungs. It contains an antibacterial alkaloid and a special antiviral protein. It is magnifies the effects of echinacea and they work wonderfully well together.

Poke root is powerful medicine, in fact, a potential poison, and the dose is very small. One drop of poke tincture may be taken daily for no more than three months as a counter to possible infection. Those with a positive diagnosis could use a single drop as frequently as six times a day. Alkaloids in poke root tincture can accumulate in the kidneys, making extended use risky, though some people have taken doses of 15 drops a day for a year or more without apparent harm. Caution: You can feel spacy and out of your body when taking poke, especially at higher doses. The first few times, take it after dinner and stay home so you can judge your reaction.

To be assured of a supply of poke tincture, you may need to make it yourself, as it is rarely found for sale. Poke is a common garden and roadside weed of northeastern North America, tall (5-7 feet) with conspicuous dark purple berries and magenta-hued stalks. Dig roots after hard frost, when tops are dead and yellowed, and tincture, fresh, for six weeks in 100 proof vodka

Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus) is widely considered the single most effective immune tonic and adaptogen in the herbal realm. Safe and inexpensive, it helps boost your immune system to respond quickly to infection and mitigates the effects of stress. Astragalus root is also an excellent ally for building powerful natural immunity. Both, or either, may be taken daily for extended periods with no ill effects. I throw several pieces of these roots in every pot of soup I cook. Tincture is less effective as a tonic; and I avoid capsules completely.

Ginseng root (Panax quinquefolius or Panax ginseng) is another exceptional ally to boost your immune system, especially when there is physical or emotional stress. In any form (tincture, tea, extract) it nourishes production of interferon, phagocytes, antibodies, and killer T-cells that all help create natural immunity. So long as you need ginseng, there’s no overdose; if you take it when you don’t need it however, it may produce an unpleasant, jittery, speedy sensation.

But herbs alone are not enough to create natural immunity. What we think, and what we consume, are also important parts to boost your immune system. Candace Pert, visiting professor of neuroscience at Rutgers University, has proven that every cell of the body participates in the immune system through an integrated network of chemical, electrical, and hormonal signals. The immune system is a network, she says, which resonates with the vibrations that surround it. It is as affected by emotions as by bacteria, as impacted by thoughts as by drugs.

Long-standing low-level depression, smoldering anger that is never expressed, bitterness and vengeance projected into the future are all known to depress immune functioning. Prayer, affirmations, positive thinking — no matter what you call it, talking lovingly to yourself helps to boost your immune system. One of the fiercest old women I know, healer Margo Geiger, taught me to not only think good thoughts but also to unthink immune system stressing phrases like: “This is killing me,” or “I’m dying to . . .” (“Let’s live for it!” she’d say.)

Specialized cells which eliminate bacterial and viral infections are made as needed by the immune system. Richly supply your immune system with nutrients, and it easily counters infection, building healthy white blood cells to kill anthrax and other germs. Starve your immune system and it will falter, leaving your lymph nodes and other tissues open to infection and destruction.

My favorite foods for helping to boost your immune system include beets, carrots, garlic, medicinal mushrooms, seaweeds, and dark leafy greens (including nettle infusion). For rapid results, try miso soup with seaweed and wild mushrooms. Try Immune A Go Go Soup from Susun Weed’s book Breast Cancer? Breast Health!

Carotenes strengthen and activate all parts of the immune system, especially the thymus (the “master gland of immunity”). A half-cup of dandelion greens, two cups of nettle infusion, a small baked sweet potato, or two large cooked carrots or beets is a “dose;” but ten times that much can be consumed safely and build natural immunity. Repeated doses provide a cumulative effect starting about a week after you begin.

Selenium is a trace mineral with special abilities for building natural immunity. Best sources are organic garlic, medicinal mushrooms, and astragalus. Zinc helps build energetic white blood cells (which eliminate bacterial infections). Best sources are echinacea, nettles, and seaweed.

The B-vitamin complex, especially B6 (pyridoxine), is critical to immune system health. Best sources are potato skins, broccoli, prunes, and lentils.

Virtually all drugs depress the immune system. This includes caffeine and nicotine, alcohol, prescribed drugs, “recreational” drugs, and vitamin/mineral supplements. For a healthy immune system, eat nourishing food and forgo the pills.

Both light and dark are necessary for a strong immune system. For optimum immune system strength, sleep in a totally dark room at night, and spend at least 15 minutes a day outside without glasses or contacts. Full spectrum sunlight is needed to trigger the production of important immune system components.

Exercise is an excellent way to tonify the immune system. A number of clinical trials have shown regular exercise to be strongly linked to heightened immunity. The emphasis is on regular. It is better to walk one mile four times a week for a month than to jog 16 miles once a month.

In Summary, strengthen you immune system with a good diet, adequate sleep, regular physical activity, emotional well-being, and a few of the recommended herbal allies of your choice. Always remember to use herbs and herbal preparations simply and safely. Avoid immune compromising substances such as coffee, tobacco and medications. With a strengthened immune system you will not only enjoy better health, but you will be less likely to be susceptible to infection and possible death from bacterial and/or viral invasions. Faith in your body’s ability to protect itself will continue to bolster and reinforce the immune system as your mental well-being improves.

2 Comments

  1. Andrew

    You mention that smallpox is in the hands of terrorists. I’ve not seen any news of this and thought the only stocks of the smallpox virus were held by the governments of USA and Russia. Hasn’t it been eradicated otherwise?

    Confused….

  2. Abdirahman

    Thank you very much for your great effort on this subject and I really appreciate it because immune boosting is like preventing diseases before they attach you

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